Tag Archives: savings

Mid Year Networth Check In

It’s been a while since I’ve written about finances on this blog, and since it’s somehow half way through the year it’s time to do a quick check in. So, the first half of this year has not been as profitable as it should have been given my high income, but the wedding just wiped out most of my gains. My stock has been performing ok so I haven’t lost money on paper, but I could be doing much better right now had I not gone crazy on my wedding. I don’t regret it, though, and it just inspires me to tighten my wallet for the rest of the year to hit my goals.

My goal WAS $500k before having kids and it still kind of is — I’m not pregnant yet and I’m at $373k in net worth right now… leaving $127k left to achieve my goal before I have my first child. Even if I got pregnant tomorrow, that leaves me nine months to accumulate $127k, which is $14k a month… not exactly doable (I figure being frugal with my current income I can save about $6k a month) but this is all on the hypothetical if I get pregnant tomorrow which likely won’t happen. More likely it will take me at least a year to get pregnant (and we aren’t going to really start trying until after our actual honeymoon next spring) so that buys me an extra 9 months at least… getting me to $7k a month savings/interest needed to hit my goal. While it will be tough the goal actually seems POSSIBLE to hit. It all depends on when I get pregnant and if I can keep my job – both serious up in the air variables – but if I’m not quite at $500k when I have a kid it won’t be the end of the world. It’s just a random goal keeping me on track to $2M+ in retirement.

(See first half of year being kind of bleh below:)

Screen Shot 2016-07-03 at 3.39.43 AM

I’m counting wedding gifts towards my total which I guess I should split in half with my husband, but he/his family didn’t pay for much of the wedding, so I’m currently keeping them toward my net worth (it still doesn’t cover all of what I spent on the wedding.) I’ll have to write another post on married finances because that’s worth a post (at least) but for now I’m still tracking my net worth independently. I think I will until I get to $500k because what fun would it be to merge our finances and get there by cheating and adding his small savings into mine. I want to get to $500k so I can move on to my next goal of $750k and then the big $1M. I think $1M by 40 is achievable but I might not go for that… I might aim for $1M by 45 or 50 and slow my career down a bit and seek out a better career that brings more happiness and creative fulfillment. Once I get to $500k I don’t want to go under it by much, I feel that’s a good amount for financial freedom when I still want to work full time.

How I Increased My Networth 13% in 2015

Last year I increased by net worth from $309,894 in January of 2015 to $352,066 in January of 2016 (increase of $42,112 or 13% YoY increase.) This is not accounting for the last week of declines, which may or may not hinder 2016 growth. With a total net worth of $352k to start this year, I’m focused on my goal of hitting $400k by the end of 2016. Although this isn’t my original goal of $500k by the end of 2016, I think $400k is still a very aggressive and challenging goal for this year.

Screen Shot 2016-01-11 at 9.28.52 PM

In 2015, my stock portfolio increased from $144k to $171k. My retirement portfolio increased from $152k to $171k. Thus, the year concluded with approximately $342k in active investments (mostly stocks.) This is why when the market dips my portfolio significantly decreases. Since I have a substantial amount of funds in the stock market I tend to wait now a bit before putting large sums into play beyond what is already invested.

Goals for 2016:

Stocks: $200k, including $15k additional in Vanguard admiral healthcare fund, which has a $50k minimum. This would = $29k in net new investment, or ~$2.5k per month. If the market drops lower than monthly investments will have to increase to make up the difference.

  • $1250 / month — Vanguard Healthcare Fund (to get to $50k admiral minimum)
  • $400 / month — loyal3 fee-free partial stock investing
  • $850 / month — Vanguard fund TBD to get to $10k admiral (might reinvest in the dividend growth fund I sold for losses after a month or so. We’ll see.)

Retirement: $190k (max out 401k and IRA for 2016 — $23.5k additional investment, or $2k per month)

  • $18k = 401k max
  • $5.5k = vanguard IRA (post tax)

Cash: $10k – I’d like to close out the year with a $10k emergency fund.

This = a total monthly investment of approximately $4.5k per month, up to $6.5k if the market drops further. $6.5k is fairly impossible w/ my general monthly expenses plus the wedding, so I think the $4.5k goal (esp with some of it in pre-tax dollars) is a reasonable objective. If the market sucks this year then I probably won’t get to $400k, but I’ll still be buying discount stocks which will hopefully go up at some point in the next 10 years to make up for any losses.

If I can do this then and maintain my job I should be able to close the year out with $400k net worth. This would be a very exciting achievement for this year, as I’d still be on target to hit $500k prior to 35 (2018.)

November Networth Check-In and Retirement Update

Now that I am “in between incomes,” so to speak, I am re-focusing my objectives for total assets this year, and beginning planning for 2016 based on my potential earnings at my new opportunities.

As a reminder, my goal was to close out 2015 with $400,000 in net worth. That figure was always a stretch, but it isn’t going to happen this year. My new goal is to wrap up the year with at least $350,000 in net worth, which is about a 15% increase in my nest egg – not bad but not great either. My goal is to give birth to my first child in the summer of 2017, when I’m about to turn 34 (yikes.) That means getting pregnant in the fall of 2016 or soon after would be ideal. That means that I still want to aim for $500k in net worth by the time I have my first kid (let’s call that July of 2017.) This is about 19 months to increase my net worth by $150k.

Let’s start with where I am today — according to www.networthIQ.com my current net worth is $380,783. I will subtract my car ($8000) and stock options that will soon be worth nothing from that ($16,000) to what is my “actual” net worth — so about $356k. I’m also losing money now since unemployment doesn’t cover my monthly expenditures, so assuming the stock market does decently this month and I land a new job for December start (which is looking quite likely) I should be able to close out the year about $350k. A reminder, in January of 2009 I had about $5k to my name (see graph below.)

november net worth

In order to hit my goal of saving $150k in 18 months (assuming ending 2015 with $350k), I need to “save” $8333 per month. How is THAT going to happen?

If I (knock on wood)  increase my income levels in my next job to $190k (which is super exciting and feels like too much yet if the market will pay that for my services, I’ll take it!), that is a take-home of about $9400 a month (which is a lot and really starts making this dream possible – this is where it gets exciting!) Even with my average spending of about $3500 a month,  I will have $5900 per month to put away. But this also, theoretically, is two years of 401k investment, which I can max out each year. So that’s $36,000 of the total $150k right there (assuming I can keep my job and do well at it!) Ok, so one opportunity has a 3% match of your salary on that, which is awesome (I’ve NEVER had a 401k match in my entire career!) That means each year I’d make an extra ~$5700 just for putting the money in my 401k (if I’m understanding the match thing correctly.) So that is $11,400 on top of the $36k. Ok, so that takes care of $47,400 of the $150,000, and leaves a slightly more realistic $102.6k left to save over 18 months, or, $5700 per month. Income is reduced a bit with the 401k investment, of course, by $18000 a year – but that’s all pre-tax. But with bonus, etc, it should balance out to still taking home somewhere around $9k a month, or maybe a little less. That’s still a lot for the short-term goal.

Now, let’s assume my stock portfolio / the market increases by an average of 5% each year. It could be less and it could be more, but let’s say 2% – 5%. That is somewhere between $7000 and $17500 for year one, and a max of $20.9k in year two (at 5%), minimum of $8368 (for the entire year, but I’ll count that in these numbers since even if I’m not working my portfolio will continue to gain interest.) Ok, so on the more conservative end with just a 2% year-over-year gain, I’ll have another $15,368 covered by investment interest…

$150,000 goal
$36,000 = 401k investment
$11,400 = 401k match @ 3% of income
$15,368 = portfolio interest at 2% YoY
———————————————
$87,232 to save in 18 months, or,
$4846 per month

This is very doable, as long as I select a job where I can stay a minimum of 18 months. One opportunity does not have 401k match, so I am leaning toward the one that does, since this clearly helps substantially in reaching my long-standing goal of $500k by childbirth.

Once I have kids, I am expecting to work part-time and see my annual savings levels decrease. Of course, I’ll have a husband who is also working, but he doesn’t earn as much as I do or invest his savings beyond a Roth IRA (which he’ll no longer be eligible for once we’re married – yeay marriage.) We’re not really combining incomes when we’re married – just continuing to split major household expenses. We’ll probably start to split a little more… right now we just split rent (I pay more since I make more) and food (we spend way too much on food for two people) — but in the future when we’re married I can see us splitting healthcare expenses, and maybe things like gas/transit. When we have a kid all those expenses will be split too. Luckily I have a penchant for household accounting. What a great hobby!

Seriously, though, if I can get to $500k before I have a kid, this frees me up so much from this looming fear of the future I have. It’s not exactly a nest egg that will make me rich, but it’s a very good start to be at $500k by 34. The goal was by 30 but so what… goals are meant to be hard to reach, but they keep you focused on getting to where you need to be.

With $500k, if I can manage to not touch that money until I’m 65, at an annual return of 5%, that gets me to about $2M in retirement (not counting any future earnings or my husband’s earnings/savings. At a 10% YoY return that’s about $8.7M in retirement. Heck, if that grows at 10% YoY in 20 years once hitting $500k, that will be worth $3.3M – not exactly placing me in the .01%, but certainly providing enough income for early retirement / starting my own business / doing what I want when I’m 55 years old. I know a lot of women in their early 50s and I can see this age being a good time to have that flexibility. You’re still healthy enough to trade and have fun, your kids are old enough to appreciate spending time with you (hopefully) and overall if you’ve been smart about saving over the years, you can take a moment to actually enjoy life.

So when people read this blog and comment about how this $500k goal is so silly, well, it really isn’t.

The MOST important thing right now for all of this is picking a job where I can stay stable at for the next 19 months, at a minimum. That’s a long time and I’m going to take it month by month and focus on being so productive my employer couldn’t even dream of replacing me. 18 months is just 6 quarters, and that will go fast, especially if I’m pregnant for half of them!

I really hope I can do it. I’ve come so far. This seems within reach. Having my first kid at 33/34 is not ideal, I’m going to have to have my second at 36 and if I want a third, well, that’s going to have to be pretty much right away after that. This leaves me little time to keep earning at the same rate, especially in my field, where having kids doesn’t seem to align with the amount of hours required to work. I have to make the money now, so I can leave the options open for the future.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tracking Towards 2015 $400k Networth Goal

The big bumps in my networth have always come at times when other aspects of my life are completely out of whack. I am probably spending about 90% of my waking life on work right now, and that’s still not enough, but I’m really seeing successful growth in my personal networth, which will be very helpful later when I have kids and want more flexibility in life. Every time it gets really hard, I have to stop, breathe, and remind myself that there is an endgame to all of this.

The level to conquer this year is passing over $400k in networth. With this being my first year aiming to save $100k, anything could happen. For the last four years I’ve saved (with investment growth and actual savings) $50k per year, so this $100k savings is a huge leap – made possible only by that previous savings and investments, plus growth in my own career.

While I’m a bit OCD about tracking my progress, it helps to see numbers hit month after month. It’s quite motivating to keep focused on the long-term picture.

I have a google spreadsheet where I’ve estimated were I should be bi-weekly for my networth throughout the year to keep on top of my progress. The stock market is always going to go up and down and up and down, so I won’t always be quite on track, but if I do notice that my progress isn’t where it should be, I’ll be extra frugal and invest more of my paycheck that month. If the market is performing well, I’ll usually pick a few individual stocks to invest in that have strong long-term prospects but haven’t done well in the short term. Usually I’ll just invest in index funds or wait until my portfolio is down a bit more and then buy more index funds. I like Vanguard because I can dollar cost average there for free, and I like Loyal3 to buy stocks because I can purchase them for free as well (I need to try out Robinhood too.) No more Sharebuilder investing, $7 trades for me!

Today, my “actual” networth (not including my car but including about $16k in private company stock that will likely be worthless in a year or two), is $322.6k, which is slightly over the goal for 3/15/2015 ($320.8k.) I’m pretty much right on track (always like to be trending slightly above target than under if possible.) There is still a long way left to $400k, of course ($77.4k to be exact) but it’s achievable if markets perform well. If I keep my job for the remainder of the year, I can realistically save $5k a month, or $45k for the rest of the year, which brings me to $367, $43k short of goal. It will take strong bonus income and investment growth to actually hit this number. Yet I’m at the least tracking to goal.

I’ll be satisfied if I end the year with $375k in networth, but am pushing myself to get to $400k. At $400k, if I can see 5% growth in 2016, that’s $20k of my $100k savings goal for the year taken care of – and if I see 10% growth, then that’s $40k of it, which would be a huge help.

I’m not sure how the next two years are going to play out – everything is so shaky and uncertain right now. I feel confident that I’ll be able to get to $350k networth this year (tracking towards my prior goal of $50k increase per year) but there’s a chance I could go well over that. I’ve just given myself $400k as a stretch goal to see how far I can, well, stretch to get there.

One thing is for certain – when I do have kids, there is no way in hell I would want to do a job like this. My current role is perfect for people who have no kids and no life. I’m ok with that for a year, or two, but then I’m going to figure out how to transition to a role that will likely pay a lot less and require a lot less hours – so I can finally find some form of work-life balance, or just overall life balance. Sigh, that would be nice.

 

 

Getting my Finances in Order – End of Year Edition

I understand why the rich have personal CFAs to help them manage their finances. Trying to do this properly and have a 24/7 full-time job is a bit chaotic… I can’t imagine making sense of this with kids to boot. For now I have a few free hours each week to make sure I’m keeping on budget, investing the right amount towards my retirement, and paying off bills so I don’t generate any nasty late fees or dings to my credit.

At the moment, the big question is when to pay for what. I’d like to hire a CFA to help me understand this, but think that any savings I see via the CFAs advice would be washed out and then some via the CFAs fee. If someone is super rich then whatever a CFA charges will not be more than their savings gained via the outside expertise, but when we’re taking tens or hundreds of dollars it’s unclear to me if there’s value in bringing in outside help. I really want to make myself an expert so I can make the best choices, but that, again, is not possible with a full-time job.

Right now the biggest question is December spending. I typically play my cards to save up a chunk of cash at the end of each calendar year so I can splurge, so to speak, on my 401k in the first months of the next year. I never have faith I can keep my job for the entirety of the year (the reality of startup life) nor do I have faith my next position will have access to a 401k. There are also various reasons why investing earlier in the year is better vs later, though a lot depends on the stock market performance (i.e. if stock market is sucking at end of previous year then odds are it will start to go up at some point so investing early is important, vs if stocks are performing well like they are now and a downward run seems more likely, so dollar cost averaging over the course of the year is the better way to go.) (*this is my theory and not validated in any shape or form.)

The other open question is how much to put towards my Roth IRA this year. I’m going to be on the line where my contributions are reduced, but I’m really not clear by how much because I’ve held so many different jobs this year – not to mention have dividends and stock sales coming from multiple accounts – and I haven’t done a good job in keeping track of my total earnings. This is where I’m confused as to whether I should just max out my Roth IRA and then deal with recharacterizing before Oct 15, 2015 (and likely have to hire a CFA for this) or just stay well under the limit and accept I’ll probably miss out on some future tax savings (though at my income level who knows if Roth IRAs really hold any value anyway.)

I’m also questioning what to do with my $600 doctor’s bill because I’m waiting for my COBRA to kick in (I sent in paperwork but apparently did it wrong so had to re-send it in.) The actual COBRA costs $800 for the two months so now I’m wondering if I should just pay the bill and have a lapse in coverage – need to do more research into how bad that actually is. I have insurance now through work, but I would be facing the lapse if I don’t legally backdate the COBRA with that $800 payment, which is only $200 or so more than what I owe anyway…

Meanwhile I owe my boyfriend a good $12,000 because he’s been paying my chunk of the rent over the last year. I only don’t feel bad about that because he has most of his money sitting in a checking account (talk about risk adverse) and I’m investing this loan and will pay him back slowly. Given how much it will cost us to buy a house every dollar matters and having thousands of dollars sitting in a bank. At least last year I convinced him to start a Roth IRA.

You know, these are all first world problems but they’re problems nonetheless. I’m going to create a new post to go live tomorrow on how I’m going to manage this mess of my December 2014 finances.

Financially Planning for Parenthood

Given that I’m going to be an older mother — turning 31 next month and not married yet let alone pregnant — I’ve done a bit of spreadsheeting around how I can afford to have a child. This puts me a little more at ease given that I can live frugally while earning a reasonably high income, save a lot, and put myself in a much better position to have children.

In my chart I noted how much I plan to save each month and have a column for lower average annual interest rates (5%) and higher ones (10%) from age 31 to 40. The chart otherwise includes the following expectations:

1) I will save $5000 per month between now and the time I have my first child (3/1/2017, give or take)

2) I will take 3 months of unpaid leave after having my first child and save $0 per month over those 3 months.

3) I will return to work full time and continue saving $5000 per month (buying less stuff for myself to offset stuff for baby) until baby #2

4) baby #2 will be born 1/1/2020. At this time I have reduced my monthly savings to $0 per month. I may want to work at this time but I want to plan to allow myself to not work and have enough money in our family to afford this. I want to be able to then afford to live off of my husband’s salary while my savings can grow for our retirement nest egg. We’ll probably have to move to a cheaper state at this point.

Based on these 4 constants and the compound interest variable, the range of my networth at age 40 would be $856,634 to 1,271,596 (*not counting my partner’s savings.) And baby #1 will just be turning age 7 or so, which is when babies become kids and start to get expensive… just in time for me to go back to work.

So this all seems rather do-able as long as I keep my head down and focus on the 58 months of saving $5k a month — so 4.8 years, give or take, or $280,000 of savings over that time period (which is a lot… but seems at least somewhat possible.) Given my potential annual bonus is anywhere from $0k to $40k after tax, I could actually get to that amount much quicker if I do my job well. Let’s just say I obtain a quarter of my annual bonus for those four years — $30k per year — that actually gets me to the $24.1k $280k goal much quicker.

That said – I’m not accounting for IVF costs which will likely be needed and will likely be very expensive (I should account for $100k for two kids and it might not even work…)

Thus in order for me to comfortably have children, I must focus on my job — really over the next two years — and attempt to obtain at least 50% of my annual bonus.

Inputting my networth growth with 50% bonus (~20k extra per year) by the time I have baby #1 (3/1/2017) I will have reached my goal of $500k network — with $507k networth with the 5% interest and $560k with 10%. Clearly I have my work cut out for me. But I can do this so the rest of my life can provide what I really want — not “no work” — but choice and flexibility.

Here is my Mint.com goals which I’ve adjusted for January 2016 target dates. I will focus on tracking to these numbers hitting the maximum possible bonus possible to achieve my desired results.

Screen Shot 2014-10-20 at 2.32.19 AM

Is my networth really $300k?

My networth calculations are a bit of a hot mess right now. I’m not sure exactly what to count and what not to count. Actual networth figures don’t matter that much (they change so dramatically each day due to fluctuations in the stock market once you have a couple of hundred thousand dollars in savings) but given my goal this year was to hit $300k with a $325k stretch goal, I was surprised this morning to find my spreadsheets telling me that I have actually already hit $300,000 in networth.

Of course with my unemployment period that isn’t going to last for long, but I’m going through and checking my calculations on this bold number which seems off. I must have made a numerical error somewhere, right? Well, let’s see…

 

Account Amount
Cash (Liquid)
Checking $10775
Savings $370
TOTAL CASH $11,145
Debts
Credit Card Debt -$333
Paying Soon -$4,000
TOTAL DEBTS -$4,333
Property
Car $10,000
TOTAL PROPERTY $10,000
Investments
Sharebuilder $93,083
Vanguard Stocks $24,299.37
Prosper $856.04
Lending Club $387.53
Startup Co Stock * (this is likely worth $0 and a $16.4k loss) $16,400
TOTAL INVESTMENTS $135,026
Education
529 Plan $4399
TOTAL EDUCATION $4399
Retirement Accounts
Vanguard IRA $26,674.61
Sharebuilder IRA $13,805.69
401k $63,044
TOTAL PRE-TAX RETIREMENT $103,524.30
Vanguard Roth IRA $28,263.81
Sharebuilder Roth IRA $12,228.92
TOTAL POST-TAX RETIREMENT $40,492.73
TOTAL NETWORTH $300,254

So. It does appear that my total networth reached $300k this month. Hurrah. It’s not “real” because it includes $16.4k in startup stock in one company that will likely go under and thus that will be a $16.4k loss — plus I don’t like including my car in my networth because that is going to go down in value in the coming years, however the Kelly Blue Book value for my car in good condition for a dealer trade in is $10,728, so I’m pricing it at $10,000 assuming I could sell to a private party for about this amount in a few years if I desperately needed the cash. I’m not counting what I estimate to be $1665 in frequent flier miles which, valued at a half cent each, I’m saving up for my big honeymoon trip. If I can get 2 cents per mile then they’re worth $6600. But, again, I’m not including those in my networth as they’re extras and will never be something I can get to spend if I ever run out of money.

As noted in my earlier post, while on unemployment I want to try to maintain my networth. A lot will depend how quickly I can get a new job, since my unemployment paycheck doesn’t even cover my full rent ($1800 unemployment taxed at 35% = $1170 and my rent is $1350, as I’ve noted previously.) If I can get a new job by Oct 1 I think I can recover and exit the year, based on these calculations, with $300k networth at a minimum, unless the stock market tanks. If I can’t get a job for months though my networth will start to drop. It’s not the end of the world assuming I can get another good job by end of the year, but I’d prefer to have one by Oct 1. I don’t think I can get to $325,000 networth which was my actual goal for this year, but I’ll be content exiting the year over $300k.

If you’ve been reading my blog you know that I try to save / earn interest on investments to increase my networth by a minimum of $50k per year. In my 30s I wanted to bump this to $75k per year until I have kids, at which point who knows what I’ll be able to save on an annual basis (ahh.) I really want to get to $500k before I have my first kid. Saving $75k per year would be a huge help because that means I just need 2.5 more years to hit this goal. However with $50k a year I need 4 years more. Given I’m going on 31 and want to have my first kid by the time I’m 33, I have to take this $75k annual savings goal very seriously. What this requires is landing a job that I love (enough) and a solid paycheck ($130k minimum, ideally $150k – $180k) and a semi-frugal lifestyle for the next 2-4 years.

Once $500k is obtained if I earn 5% on average that in one year that’s $25,000 in interest alone without compounding. Of course I will still want to work and make money (I won’t feel comfortable with my networth until it is $2,000,000) but the $500k sets me up for a quality life as a mother where I can opt to work full time or take some time off to spend with my kids. So I feel ok about where things stand right now — I just would really like to find a great new job, stat.

My Life on Unemployment Budget

Going from $6k a month after tax to $1.8k pre-tax takes some major adjusting in spending habits. Lucky for me I don’t have kids and while my rent is high I don’t have a mortgage or house to worry about losing. My goal while on unemployment (other than to find a job that suits me and that I can succeed in) is to – with the exception of stock market fluctuations – maintain my networth as much as possible. This means no more frivolous trips to Sephora (in fact I’m returning about $100 in items I purchased prior to losing my job) and no more adventures to the outlet mall. Spending now is limited to basic necessities until I find another job and remain employed for a period of over three months for stability insurance.

Current Networth: $284,000 (Goal do not dip below $280k before end of 2014. Save $70k in 2015)

September Budget

Income: $1800 – 35% taxes =  $1170

Rent: $1350
Car Insurance: $104.69
Health Insurance: TBD ($250?)
Food: $200
Bridesmaid (flight, bridal shower split contrib): $500
Phone Bill: $100
Other Bills: $75 (estimate)
======================
$2579 Spend
$284k-$1479 = $282k Sept Networth End

——————————————————————————–

October Budget

Income: $1800 – 35% taxes =  $1170

Rent: $1350
Car Insurance: $104.69
Health Insurance: TBD ($250?)
Food: $200
Bridesmaid (flight, bachlorette party): $1000
Phone Bill: $100
Other Bills: $75 (estimate)
——————————————————–
$3079 Spend
$282k-$1909 = $280k Oct Networth End

——————————————————————————–

November Budget

Income: $1800 – 35% taxes =  $1170

Rent: $1350
Car Insurance: $104.69
Health Insurance: TBD ($250?)
Food: $200
Bridesmaid (flight, hotel, wedding gift): $1000
Phone Bill: $100
Other Bills: $75 (estimate)
——————————————————–
$3079 Spend
$280k-$1909 = $278k Nov Networth End

… and if I don’t have a job by December 1st that pays more than $1800 a month, then things start to get ugly. That said, I’m keeping about $7000 in my liquid bank account right now to tied me over until December. This just isn’t looking good. I wish my rent wasn’t so damn high. It’s my own fault. I talked to my bf about reassessing our split (I pay $1350 and he pays $1000 based on an agreement we had when we signed the lease — which was a fair percentage of our income — but obviously that has changed. I informally ran the idea by him to adjust it back to to a 50/50 split for the time being, but in reality I don’t think it’s fair of me to change what I agreed to and I do have the funds to make up for it while I look for a job. If we’re getting married soon anyway it doesn’t really matter. I know if I continue to pay my agreed on portion of the rent he will feel less bothered by any length of time I spend out of work. Though paying $1175 each would be a big help for now. :/ I think if I don’t have a job by Nov 1 I’ll push on splitting 50/50 for the remainder of our lease, or until I get another job.

The good news is that in December I can return to a reasonable “Frugal” lifestyle (no more bridesmaid duties) which looks more like this…

———————–

November Budget

Income: $1800 – 35% taxes =  $1170

Rent: $1350
Car Insurance: $104.69
Health Insurance: TBD ($250?)
Food: $200
Phone Bill: $100
Other Bills: $75 (estimate)
——————————————————–
$2080 Spend
$278k-$910= $277k Nov Networth End

In other words… if by December I still don’t have a job (eeeks) then I should be able to start spending at an operating loss of $1000 per month, vs over $2000.  But then again if I don’t have a job by then I have other more serious problems on my hands.

 

 

 

May Spending Recap & Networth

In May my networth increased 3.18% to $289,005 from $280,086. $1289 of that increase was in new savings so the rest was the stock market, woohoo. In this post, I’ll share all of the fun things I wasted my money on this month to shame myself into not spending on such things again next month! Luckily the stock market has been on a bit of a crazy ride up — but what goes up must come down, so it’s important not to get caught up in the rapid progress towards my $325,000 networth goal for 2014 (a 30% increase over 2013 including savings and investment growth.)

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May Spending: $5003 (of Income $6292)
remainder: $800 /// really shitty savings month, but June will be better (damn it)

$1547.79 – Federal Taxes (Late – Long Story, Not Proud)
$1409 – Home (rent, appliances and some food also included)
$703 – Health & Fitness (most of this will be reimbursed by FSA/insurance)
$313 – Food & Dining (50% of total cost)
$388 – Entertainment (1 broadway show, 2 tix concert, 2 tix regional theatre, 2 tix event)
$362 – Auto & Transport
$552 – Shopping
$122 – Bills & Utilities
$32 – Fees & Charges
$21 – Gifts & Donations

Fantasizing About Graduate School

It’s time. For almost nine years I’ve been in the workforce, far away from academia, exploring a multitude of careers and learning more about myself while saving nearly $300k. What I’ve learned is that in order to be happy, I must have a day job that satisfies much of my fundamental needs:

  1. Enables me to be a SOCIAL, collaborative creature, interacting with the same people on a regular basis, over the course of multiple projects.
  2. Enables me to work on PROJECTS as opposed to ongoing, never-ending, headache-inducing programs. I need a sense of completion. My brain requires the structured chunking of time in order to be most productive and content.
  3. Enables me to APPLY CREATIVITY. I do not want to live a life where creativity is the end goal. The creativity should be a means to accomplish a very clear problem that has been identified via patterns or an examination of problems that are likely to arise in the near-term future. Continue reading