Category Archives: Other

T-15 hours to our first ultrasound: one baby? Two babies? Or more?

It’s a little crazy to think that in 15 hours I’ll be looking at a picture of my uterus and a yolk sack that holds my future child. It’s even more crazy to think that there’s a chance, albeit a small one, that I’ll be looking at two — or more — yolk sacks, and my future “children.”

As much as I dreamt of having twins when I was a little girl, I think I will scream if I’m pregnant with more than one. Long term, having two at once might be ideal – but short team I have no idea how we’ll manage it. I’m already in denial about having one.

It’s probably just one — hopefully one healthy baby. But, two is also a real possibility – since there were two mature follicles when we triggered this cycle… and I just felt like, oh boy, this is a strong one and this is going to be an interesting month. Plus, I saw a double rainbow last week… so I think that might be a sign. 🙂

What amount of money makes you feel free?

Wealth does not = happiness, but at some point one obtains enough money that unless it’s frivolously spent, there are many doors open for the remainder of her life. Perhaps she loves her current career and decides too stay in it today and long past retirement. Or, she is set free of the confines of taking jobs that pay well and instead tries sometimes entirely new, without concern that the investment in education may not “pay off.” Or, she decides to create art or travel the world or just sit and study the sunset over the same ocean every day while doing half-assed yoga on a beach.

In reality, my goal in life is to generate enough wealth to feel this sense of freedom. Yes, that likely means I would be in the 1%, and it is not necessary to be happy at all. Most people will never achieve anywhere close to this. I don’t know what the number is, exactly, but it’s certainly more than I’ll ever be able to obtain, especially given my proclivity for purchasing too many shoes. Yet, it’s what keeps me going – that hope that one day I’ll not only be able to afford a house, but also to decorate it, and to invite friends over for reasonably-lavish dinner parties featuring fine wines and whiskies that my husband and I have prepared in our gourmet kitchen.

When I look at my net worth, now a touch over $500k, I feel both thrilled and disheartened. I realize that most people in the US retire with a networth much lower than that – that most people in the world would be ecstatic to have this amount in savings and stocks. But, then I also spend too much time exploring housing options on Zillow.com and see that 2 bedroom, 1 bath houses in the area are now selling for $1.3M or more, and my dream of purchasing a 3 bedroom, 2 bath home with a private backyard goes poof in the night. I look around at my decent 1 bedroom apartment with its sterile white walls — my bicycle parked so elegantly in the living room filled with a Craiglisted, 10-year-old couch, broken IKEA coffee table, and two Target bookshelves that are about to crumble, and I know even at this stage of my mid-30s life I can do better.

I wish I was at a point where spending $100k on IVF wouldn’t put a dent in my savings, or that I felt I could have children and provide for them a life that is comparable to my own middle class upbringing in the suburbs of an east coast city, where housing is much more affordable. I keep wondering what that number is… even as I obtain jobs which provide greater potential for income growth, there is a giant gap between my life today and this concept of wealth I have in my head, that I haven’t fully quantified yet.

Wealth.

What is it?

  • $2M per adult in retirement (so, $4M for a married couple)
  • Ownership of 4br, 3ba home outright (additional $2M – or $1.5M for 3br)
  • 50 years of $50k / year for house fixing as needed, taxes, other fees ($2.5M)
  • 50 years of $100k /  year for eating/travel/shopping ($5M)
  • College tuition for 2-3 kids ($500k)

This is, of course, well exaggerating what is needed for financial freedom, but to put a number on the amount I’d want in the bank account to feel financially free (for family), that would be….

$14,000,000

Now, even if I get more realistic here and half that…

  • $1.5M per adult in retirement ($3M)
  • $1.5M house (can’t reduce this / basic house cost here)
  • 50 years of $20k / year for house fixes (~$1M)
  • $50k / year of food and fun ($2.5M)
  • College Tuition (assuming some scholarships) – $200k

$7,000,000 is the minimum amount of wealth for financial freedom if we continue to live in this area.

Is $7M obtainable?

Maybe. But only via compound interest, and with that one wouldn’t know if she met her goals until she was in her 80s… plenty time past when purchasing a home would make sense. So she must have blind faith in the stock market OR figure out a way to expedite the growth of her portfolio. In short, how fast can I get to $7M from $500k?

My goal at this point is to have $1M by the time I turn 40. That will only be obtainable if I maintain my current job for the next four years, perform extremely well (no pressure), and we keep our cost of living low for this time.

Contributing $50k per year for the next 6 years, if my portfolio grows at an average of 5% per year, I will have a net worth of $1M by 40. This requires maintaining my job and living in a 1 bedroom apartment for the next six years, living rather frugally, all during the time in my life when – if I’m going to have kids – I will be having children (hopefully, two, within the next six years.)

If I don’t end up having children, the numbers change significantly – but I definitely want kids and I definitely want to pay for infertility treatments as needed to have them. Which, ultimately means that I won’t likely get to $1M by 40. But I’ll be close, as long as I keep this job for 6 years (or keep this job for 4 and obtain a similar one with equal or greater salary for the remaining 2).

At that point, if I have $1M by 40, I will have 20-ish more years of prime earning, if I work full time for those 20 years. BUT I am convinced that I want to go back to school at 40 to change careers to a lower-paid job such as counseling, not to maintain my position in a role that I’m fighting day and night to pretend to be good at. So, the $1M mark is my first taste of freedom…

This is truly a recognizable moment of freedom because if I invest $1M for 20 years at 5% rate of return, I will have $2.6M by 60, and $3.38M by 65. My husband doesn’t need as much as I do in retirement, so The $3.38M by 65 is basically my half of the $7M goal. What I would be focused on then, at 40, after the $1M is hit, is obtaining a position that I can maintain for 25 years that I enjoy which enables paying annual costs, so we don’t touch the $1M in the bank.

I’d like to own a 3br, 2ba home by the time my first child is 4. At this point, I should know if I’m having 2 children or just one (or none at all.) So – some of my net worth will have to be put into the down payment of a house. I go back and forth on buying a house but I think at this point I’m diversified enough in stocks that I can afford to own real estate, even if its growth does not keep up with the stock market (and I have the liquidity in stocks to pay for mortgage should we have any bad years in the job market.) So, I’d need $300,000 for a downpayment on a $1.5M starter home, in ~5 years.

But – I need to invest for the next 5 years to hit the $1M goal… and then in 5 years, at age 39, I’d have to take $300M out of my stocks (well $366M with 20% tax) for the downpayment. My husband may be able to contribute to this a bit – probably $100k of it in 5 years, but for simplicity (and explaining to husband) we both need to provide $150k in 5 years for our down payment.  That’s a more reasonable $180k stock sale in 5 years, leaving $748k to grow in stocks…

Annually, for the $1.5M house, costs would be…

  • $90k mortgage (approx)
  • $20k taxes (approx)
  • $1k insurance
  • $15k maintenance
  • = $126k / year ($63k per person per year for 30 years …
    $5.25k / month or $10.5k per month for 30 years)
  • Which means, for our $1.5M house, all in 30 years later, it will cost $4.08M. (Is my math right?)

Ok, so, if the numbers above are right, we cannot afford a $1.5M house in 5 years. Which, basically means we cannot afford a house, unless we can put down a much larger down payment.

In 5 years, unless there’s a housing bubble burst, I doubt there will be any real estate around here that’s less than $1.5M. My take home income is $7,000 per month and my husband’s will be about $3,000…. so, even if I keep my job and he keeps his, we can’t pay $10.5k/month when we’re only taking home $10k per month.

Really, the only potential route to wealth for us is to rent. So, maybe I’ll never own a house. Even if that’s one of our financial goals. But, it’s just so much cheaper to rent an apartment than to own a house.

Maybe, one day when we can afford to put down a 50% down payment buying a house will be worth it. But by then, a basic home will cost $2M… so… I don’t think we’ll ever have enough money to own a home.

This is why I feel so hopeless… even if we have so much more than so many people right now… I just don’t know how to have the life I want, or anything close to it. I don’t need a home today, but I want to feel like I’m making progress towards not living in a 1 bedroom apartment (and a condo won’t help much, if we were to buy one since it’s slightly more affordable, because we’d still have shared walls and annoying neighbors… might as well just rent!)

I am hoping my math is wrong…

 

 

The Horrors of Shopping this Season

I support women having the OPTION to purchase trendy items, but when every single professional clothing section (especially my go-to of Nordstrom) has their standard nice work clothes destroyed by the the following trends:

  • Ruffles
  • Bell Sleeves
  • Fringe
  • Oversized Everything!
  • Flood Pants

Ok, so the Velvet trend can be acceptable, but not in its current incarnation paired with the requirement that the velvet garment also have giant sleeves. No, no and no again.

With this new job, I figured I’d treat myself to some new professional-looking clothes. I didn’t want to spend a fortune, but I figured 3 basic outfits that look nice would do. Maybe that would cost me about $600-$800, not cheap, but not as much as the ONLY THING I COULD FIND THAT WAS NOT HORRIFICALLY UGLY… a $300 Theory shirt that was beautiful, but, $300. F that.

Ok, so I moved on to another store. Anne Taylor. The bell sleeves and on-trend everything was a bit more reserved, but still quite present. I couldn’t bare to try on any more clothes that made this 5’3 curvy figure look like a literal clown. I went home, defeated. I thought – at least I returned $500 worth of items and didn’t spend ANYTHING, so there’s that. Do you KNOW how bad the fashion has to be for me to leave the mall EMPTY HANDED? Yea, it’s that bad.

Ladies – where do you buy your work clothes?

I have a bit of a conundrum as working in Silicon Valley in a business-side role, I can’t overdress, but I can’t underdress either. Quite frankly, I have no idea what to wear. I used to love shopping, but not any more. I need help. This is important because I need to look executive without trying to hard to try to look like an exec since I’m not one. I recall the one female VP I met with (who is, of course, amazingly skinny), wore skinny jeans with a nice blazer. It looked effortless. But I feel underdressed in jeans. I used to wear dresses to my last job, but I always feel silly in dresses and fat since anything that covers my stomach doesn’t look professional… so spanx and tight-enough-to-show-my-PCOS-belly sheath dresses it is.

It’s not the end of the world, but the reality is my inability to figure out what to wear every morning, and feeling ugly in what I put on, doesn’t help in my getting to work on time or feeling confident to do the job I was hired to do. I want to look great and feel great. Is that so much to ask?

The Candle Melting Down in the Middle of a Steak Dinner

Flames blur after I can’t recall how many glasses of Zin, our glasses always replenished in our conversation from unique sides of the world of business. The dinner I hosted which I feared would be a disaster ended up working quite well – with an academic, a mid-career professional, early career professional, consultant, a peer from my company and myself – it made for a really great mix of people and fascinating evening.

I didn’t sleep last night and I feel as if my heart is about to give out. It’s only 9:40pm but I soon will close my eyes and drift off to sleep. The wine helps. My thoughts are a mix of hope and sadness. I feel as if I’m the flame in the burning solo candle in the middle of the table towards the end of the dinner when the conversation around goes on and laughter is rampant yet the candle is burning low as its wax melts into nothingness, it’s bright flame unaware of its inevitable fate.

My voice is so annoying and I always feel out of place. I don’t feel like I said anything inappropriate but nonetheless I thought I talked too much and didn’t add any value. The only time I EVER feel like I did something decent is when I say something funny and someone laughs. This is my savior. Without it I am completely and utterly alone. Making others laugh doesn’t make me fit in, but it gives me a purpose. That is what I love.

I need sleep. Soon morning will come. I am so stressed out and sad about my job. I wish I could be more appreciated. It’s my own fault that I’m not. Bu there are things I do that I believe have a lot of value but who cares. It is too late now. I am on my way out. I have to accept that and move on. But I’m so sad because I really like this industry and the people I have the opportunity to get to know. Usually I just hate everything about a job before I leave. This time… I’m mixed. I wish it had turned out better. But I need to get out soon.

The End of an Era: Closed My Bank of America Accounts

It’s about damn time – after being charged $14 a month to keep my checking account open at BoA (even after I opened my free checking account at Chase in order to shut down my BoA account) I finally shut down my checking and savings accounts once and for all. There was only about $700 left total in both accounts and I was paying a lot considering to keep it open. They didn’t even try to keep my business, which is fine by me.

BoA was where I got my first checking account, savings account, and credit card. Back then, I had about $10k (from my childhood  lawsuit) and felt like that was a lot of money. Before I started investing at other banks and online  investment firms, I walked in to a BoA branch and proudly started a laddered CD — long-term CD interest rates were 5% (!!) at the time. I didn’t realize how good that was…

Closing the BoA accounts feels like the end of a financial era for me. It signifies “Growing Up” to Chase (if that makes any sense.) So long BoA. I haven’t used you for years, so I won’t miss you.

Networth Check – September 2015

My networth – like everyone else’s – has taken a beating over the past month. I figure between the additional investments and loses I’m down about $16k in a month, which is a lot to stomach, but I’m starting to manage riding the waves of the stock market with some sort of zen. What goes down must come up, right? When the stock market goes down, I’m following my one and only investing principal – spend less and invest more now. If it goes down more, do this even more. I like buying my stock on sale.

 

chart
Including my car and a bunch of worthless stock options that I’ll likely take a big hit on next year, my networth is $352,316. That’s a far cry from my 2015 goal of $400k, but still a significant increase from 2014. Given the way the past two years could have shaped out, I’m content with where I am now. If I can manage to keep myself gainfully employed for the next year and the stock market  doesn’t totally crash, I should be able to get to $400k by the end of 2016 (age 33.)

This plan seems a bit more reasonable, giving me a couple years of the $50k increase YoY before bumping up my annual savings to $75k (all of this is including stock market growth as well.)

33 – $400k
34 – $450k
35 – $500k
36 – $575k
37 – $650k
38 – $725k
39 – $800k
40 – $875k
41 – $950k
42 – $1.025M
43 – $1.100 M
44 – $1.2M
45 – $1.3M
46 – $1.4M
47 – $1.5M
48 – $1.6M
49 – $1.7M
50 – $1.8M
51 – $1.9M
52 – $2M – FINANCIAL FREEDOM!

 

 

Judgernaught: The Root of Anxiety

Running out the door to the airport, late as usual, my father scolded my 30-year-self for not being put together. Though I have learned over the years to travel light (for five days I had one small backpack and a laptop bag), I still had my computer chord loose, which did not meet his approval. Granted, I agree it’s not the wisest to carry a computer chord loose, but no matter what I do, it’s not good enough for him. Once I came home with a roller bag and he looked at me worriedly commenting that I didn’t bring enough. You seriously cannot win with this man.

Trying to break free of all that holds me back in life, my parent’s omnipresence looms over me like a dark cloud before a torrential downpour. Every. Single. Day. I’m grateful that I had material possessions growing up, that my college was so graciously paid for by mom and dad, that I was middle class spoiled in my youth. Yet the constant criticism of who I am grated at me until I just broke. Continue reading

2014 401k Almost Maxed Out!

One of my goals for 2014 was to live on my savings and max out my 401k before obtaining access to any new funds. The good news: as of February 15 I am $550 away from maxing out my 2014 401k! The bad news is that the markets haven’t fared that well in the first few weeks of 2014, thus my $17500 investment has immediately shrunk. Boo. At least I’ve managed to survive on my “life fund” from late 2013. I’m now down to about $3000 so it’s great news that I’ll be seeing some of my salary in my next paycheck!!!

It was important for me to get the 401k out of the way early on because I am concerned I may be laid off from my job soon, and chances are I will find another position at a small company that will not offer access to a 401k. While I’ve never had access to a 401k with a match, I’ve taken full advantage of tax deferred savings when available. I’ve only had access to a 401k in 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013 and 2014. My first full-time job even brought in a 401k specialist to talk to us and then decided it wasn’t worth paying to administer the retirement plan, so we didn’t get one. I know a 401k is a luxury and I take full advantage of it when possible.

As of mid February, my networth is around $259k (including my maxed out 401k.) That kind of sucks because at the end of 2013 my networth was $250k, so I’m only “up” $9k right now (or down $8500 if you count the total amount of money I’ve put into my accounts!) Hopefully the market will rebound and I actually purchased these 401k shares on the cheap. We’ll see. It would be nice to see the $17500 earn 10% this year and conclude being worth at least $19250. Right now my current employer 401k has $59296.43 in it for 3 years of investment, worth about $19765 per year.

The good thing about maxing out my 401k early is that if I do lose my job I won’t have to worry about finding another job for this year to get tax-advantaged investments. I can start worrying about that again in 2015!

Remodeling & My Parents

I grew up in a household that wasn’t financially efficient, so it shouldn’t surprise me that my parents, like many Americans, continue to throw money into their homes when the actual home value will never be worth a lot more.

They claim they are making the updates for their own quality of life, and I believe it, but the actual amount of money they are putting into my childhood home is outrageous if you look at it from a financial perspective. Continue reading

5 Years of Investing: My Sharebuilder Trading History

I’ve got nothing to hide. Here are all my stock trades – the good, the bad, and the ugly. (Taxable Sharebuilder account only, not my Roth IRA, IRA, 401k or other investment accounts.)

Can I also note that I first bought Apple in 2009 for $115 per share. Back then that seemed REALLY expensive. Wish I bought more shares at that price!

*Note — most of these trades were purchased via Sharebuilder’s “X number of automatic investments for $12/month” program (I think it used to be 4 or 6 for $12) — which now is 12 “$1” investments for $12 month. Much better deal today. I did waste a LOT in fees early on my investing career — as you can see I didn’t actually buy a lot of shares at a time. I thought I was dollar cost averaging, but at such low investment amounts I was wasting so much money on the fees.

Date Action Stock Shares Cost Per Share Invested
1/18/2008 BUY COMV 4 $23.89 $95.56
1/18/2008 BUY GLD 4 $87.18 $348.72
1/24/2008 BUY MCD 3 $53.74 $161.22
1/29/2008 BUY WFMI 0.5411 $36.96 $20.00
1/29/2008 BUY GLD 0.219 $91.33 $20.00
1/29/2008 BUY MCD 0.3937 $50.8 $20.00
1/29/2008 BUY KOL 0.4943 $40.46 $20.00
1/29/2008 BUY EWZ 0.2667 $75 $20.00
2/5/2008 BUY WFMI 1.237 $40.42 $50.00
2/5/2008 BUY KOL 1.2151 $41.15 $50.00
2/5/2008 BUY EWZ 0.4017 $74.69 $30.00
2/19/2008 BUY WFMI 1.291 $38.73 $50.00
2/19/2008 BUY KOL 1.1707 $42.71 $50.00
2/19/2008 BUY EWZ 0.612 $81.7 $50.00
3/4/2008 BUY EPI 2.3595 $23.31 $55.00
3/4/2008 BUY GLD 0.5774 $95.26 $55.00
3/4/2008 BUY EWZ 0.6616 $83.13 $55.00
3/18/2008 BUY GLD 1.009 $99.11 $100.00
3/18/2008 BUY EWZ 0.6263 $79.83 $50.00
3/25/2008 BUY XLF 2.6525 $26.39 $70.00
3/25/2008 BUY PBD 3.9676 $24.7 $98.00
4/1/2008 BUY EPI 2.1205 $23.58 $50.00
4/1/2008 BUY PBD 2.3019 $26.07 $60.01
4/1/2008 BUY EWZ 0.5124 $78.07 $40.00
4/15/2008 BUY EPI 3.1983 $23.45 $75.00
4/15/2008 BUY XLF 3.0515 $24.58 $75.01
4/15/2008 BUY PBD 3.7928 $26.37 $100.02
6/3/2008 BUY PBD 3.3119 $29.59 $98.00
7/29/2008 BUY EPI 4.9291 $19.48 $96.02
9/23/2008 BUY EPI 5.5782 $17.21 $96.00
11/25/2008 BUY EPI 10.1524 $9.85 $100.00
1/27/2009 BUY PBD 8.3406 $11.51 $96.00
2/17/2009 BUY MCD 1.7268 $55.59 $95.99
2/17/2009 BUY PG 1.9093 $50.28 $96.00
3/3/2009 BUY COMV 22.9665 $4.18 $96.00
3/3/2009 BUY IHI 4.4635 $32.71 $146.00
3/10/2009 BUY MCD 1.8153 $52.88 $95.99
3/10/2009 BUY PG 2.148 $44.69 $95.99
3/24/2009 BUY COMV 20.2216 $7.22 $146.00
3/24/2009 BUY IHI 4.0533 $36.02 $146.00
4/7/2009 BUY COMV 13.9665 $7.16 $100.00
4/7/2009 BUY AAPL 2.1604 $115.72 $250.00
4/14/2009 BUY AAPL 0.8412 $118.87 $99.99
4/14/2009 BUY IHI 2.5806 $38.75 $100.00
4/21/2009 BUY IHI 5.2043 $38.43 $200.00
4/28/2009 BUY AAPL 1.1964 $125.38 $150.00
4/28/2009 BUY VWO 5.6532 $26.18 $148.00
5/5/2009 BUY PBD 10.553 $14.21 $149.96
5/5/2009 BUY VWO 5.0986 $29.42 $150.00
5/12/2009 BUY COMV 11.8483 $8.44 $100.00
5/12/2009 BUY VWO 4.9967 $30.02 $150.00
5/19/2009 BUY COMV 10.661 $9.38 $100.00
5/19/2009 BUY VWO 4.7908 $31.31 $150.00
5/26/2009 BUY COMV 10.166 $9.64 $98.00
5/26/2009 BUY AAPL 0.7576 $129.36 $98.00
6/2/2009 BUY COMV 9.6712 $10.34 $100.00
6/2/2009 BUY ENOC 6.3318 $23.69 $150.00
6/9/2009 BUY COMV 9.8135 $10.19 $100.00
6/9/2009 BUY ENOC 6.4963 $23.09 $150.00
6/23/2009 BUY VWO 3.34 $29.94 $100.00
6/30/2009 BUY IHI 2.2635 $44.18 $100.00
7/7/2009 BUY IHI 2.3524 $42.51 $100.00
7/14/2009 BUY IHI 2.3827 $41.97 $100.00
7/28/2009 BUY IHI 2.1801 $45.87 $100.00
8/4/2009 BUY AAPL 0.6057 $165.11 $100.01
8/11/2009 BUY AAPL 0.6146 $162.72 $100.01
8/11/2009 BUY XLF 7.2674 $13.76 $100.00
8/18/2009 BUY AAPL 0.6154 $162.49 $100.00
8/18/2009 BUY VWO 2.8952 $34.54 $100.00
9/1/2009 BUY AAPL 0.5971 $167.47 $100.00
9/8/2009 BUY ENOC 3.3647 $29.72 $100.00
9/29/2009 BUY ENOC 2.9815 $33.54 $100.00
10/20/2009 BUY VWO 2.4564 $40.71 $100.00
10/27/2009 BUY AAPL 0.6254 $199.86 $124.99
10/27/2009 BUY IHI 1.0107 $49.47 $50.00
10/27/2009 BUY MCD 0.8463 $59.08 $50.00
10/27/2009 BUY PG 0.4398 $56.85 $25.00
10/27/2009 BUY VWO 1.2544 $39.86 $50.00
11/3/2009 BUY IHI 1.0491 $47.66 $50.00
11/3/2009 BUY PG 0.8562 $58.4 $50.00
11/10/2009 BUY IHI 0.9932 $50.34 $50.00
11/10/2009 BUY VWO 1.2316 $40.6 $50.00
11/17/2009 BUY COMV 8.6344 $11.35 $98.00
11/17/2009 BUY IHI 0.9819 $50.92 $50.00
11/17/2009 BUY VWO 1.2151 $41.15 $50.00
11/24/2009 BUY IHI 0.931 $51.56 $48.00
12/1/2009 BUY IHI 0.969 $51.6 $50.00
12/29/2009 BUY AAPL 0.2379 $210.2 $50.01
12/29/2009 BUY IHI 0.9341 $53.53 $50.00
12/29/2009 BUY MCD 0.7837 $63.8 $50.00
12/29/2009 BUY VWO 1.2273 $40.74 $50.00
1/5/2010 BUY VZ 1.5133 $33.04 $50.00
1/5/2010 BUY T 1.7501 $28.57 $50.00
1/5/2010 BUY PG 0.8178 $61.14 $50.00
1/5/2010 BUY GE 6.4267 $15.56 $100.00
3/9/2010 BUY JNJ 0.7756 $64.47 $50.00
3/9/2010 BUY GE 3.0432 $16.43 $50.00
4/27/2010 BUY GE 2.5746 $19.42 $50.00
4/27/2010 BUY JNJ 0.771 $64.85 $50.00
5/4/2010 BUY GE 2.6781 $18.67 $50.00
5/4/2010 BUY JNJ 0.7757 $64.46 $50.00
5/11/2010 BUY GE 2.7824 $17.97 $50.00
5/11/2010 BUY AAPL 0.1969 $254 $50.01
5/11/2010 BUY JNJ 0.772 $64.77 $50.00
5/18/2010 BUY GE 2.7133 $17.69 $48.00
5/18/2010 BUY JNJ 0.7584 $63.29 $48.00
5/18/2010 BUY AAPL 0.1969 $253.92 $50.00
5/25/2010 BUY GE 3.0769 $15.6 $48.00
5/25/2010 BUY AAPL 0.2003 $239.64 $48.00
5/25/2010 BUY JNJ 0.8054 $59.6 $48.00
6/8/2010 BUY GE 3.309 $15.11 $50.00
6/8/2010 BUY AAPL 0.2003 $249.61 $50.00
6/8/2010 BUY JNJ 0.8614 $58.05 $50.00
6/15/2010 BUY XLF 6.8596 $14.58 $100.01
6/15/2010 BUY GOOG 0.2038 $490.79 $100.02
6/15/2010 BUY AAPL 0.1937 $258.09 $49.99
6/22/2010 BUY GOOG 0.1011 $494.44 $49.99
6/22/2010 BUY XLF 6.7659 $14.78 $100.00
6/22/2010 BUY AAPL 0.5485 $273.48 $150.00
6/29/2010 BUY GOOG 0.1089 $459.22 $50.01
6/29/2010 BUY XLF 7.0982 $14.09 $100.01
6/29/2010 BUY AAPL 0.5837 $256.99 $150.01
7/6/2010 BUY AAPL 0.5955 $251.9 $150.01
7/6/2010 BUY XLF 7.2625 $13.77 $100.00
7/6/2010 BUY VZ 1.8714 $26.72 $50.00
7/13/2010 BUY XLF 13.487 $14.83 $200.01
7/13/2010 BUY AAPL 4.024 $248.51 $1,000.00
7/20/2010 BUY XLF 17.7565 $14.08 $250.01
7/20/2010 BUY AAPL 1.021 $244.85 $249.99
7/27/2010 BUY AAPL 1.9114 $261.59 $500.00
7/27/2010 BUY XLF 13.4868 $14.83 $200.01
8/3/2010 BUY XLF 13.3608 $14.97 $200.01
8/3/2010 BUY AAPL 1.9168 $260.85 $500.00
8/10/2010 BUY AAPL 1.935 $258.4 $500.00
8/10/2010 BUY XLF 13.6063 $14.7 $200.01
8/31/2010 BUY MCD 1.3675 $73.13 $100.01
8/31/2010 BUY AAPL 0.8231 $242.98 $200.00
9/7/2010 BUY COMV 14.6843 $6.81 $100.00
9/7/2010 BUY AAPL 1.9297 $259.1 $499.99
9/14/2010 BUY COMV 23.2198 $6.46 $150.00
9/14/2010 BUY AAPL 1.6786 $268.09 $450.02
9/14/2010 BUY IHI 1.941 $51.52 $100.00
9/21/2010 BUY COMV 29.3255 $6.82 $200.00
9/21/2010 BUY XLF 6.7128 $14.9 $100.02
9/21/2010 BUY AAPL 1.7677 $282.86 $500.01
9/28/2010 BUY COMV 13.6986 $7.3 $100.00
9/28/2010 BUY AAPL 6.2267 $289.08 $1,800.01
9/28/2010 BUY XLF 10.4263 $14.39 $150.03
9/28/2010 BUY GE 3.0602 $16.34 $50.00
10/5/2010 BUY COMV 25.413 $7.87 $200.00
10/5/2010 BUY XLF 6.8079 $14.69 $100.01
10/5/2010 BUY AAPL 0.6975 $286.75 $200.01
10/12/2010 BUY AAPL 0.3367 $296.99 $100.00
10/12/2010 BUY XLF 6.8038 $14.7 $100.02
10/12/2010 BUY EPI 3.6754 $27.21 $100.01
10/19/2010 BUY XLF 6.78 $14.75 $100.01
10/19/2010 BUY EPI 3.7026 $27.01 $100.01
10/19/2010 BUY AAPL 6.4255 $311.26 $2,000.00
10/26/2010 BUY COMV 37.2671 $8.05 $300.00
10/26/2010 BUY AAPL 3.2347 $308.84 $999.00
10/26/2010 BUY XLF 6.8733 $14.55 $100.01
10/26/2010 BUY EPI 3.6497 $27.4 $100.00
11/2/2010 BUY AAPL 0.9724 $308.5 $299.99
11/2/2010 BUY XLF 6.8544 $14.59 $100.01
11/2/2010 BUY COMV 13.459 $7.43 $100.00
11/2/2010 BUY EPI 3.6248 $27.59 $100.01
11/9/2010 BUY EPI 3.5263 $28.36 $100.01
11/9/2010 BUY COMV 15.8479 $6.31 $100.00
11/9/2010 BUY XLF 6.5023 $15.38 $100.01
11/9/2010 BUY AAPL 0.9352 $320.78 $299.99
11/16/2010 BUY XLF 6.7733 $14.76 $99.97
11/16/2010 BUY COMV 160.3052 $6.24 $1,000.30
11/16/2010 BUY EPI 3.8583 $25.92 $100.01
11/23/2010 BUY COMV 80.2813 $6.23 $500.15
11/23/2010 BUY AAPL 1.9379 $309.1 $599.00
12/7/2010 BUY VZ 3.014 $33.18 $100.00
12/7/2010 BUY AAPL 1.8648 $321.75 $600.00
12/7/2010 BUY CSCO 12.7889 $19.55 $250.02
12/7/2010 BUY COMV 6.812 $7.34 $50.00
12/14/2010 BUY VZ 2.8987 $34.5 $100.01
12/14/2010 BUY COMV 7.2886 $6.86 $50.00
12/14/2010 BUY AAPL 1.867 $321.38 $600.02
12/14/2010 BUY CSCO 12.6816 $19.71 $249.95
1/4/2011 BUY XLF 6.1125 $16.36 $100.00
1/4/2011 BUY AAPL 3.0075 $332.5 $999.99
1/4/2011 BUY CSCO 4.8638 $20.56 $100.00
1/11/2011 BUY VZ 84.8016 $35.38 $3,000.28
1/11/2011 BUY AAPL 8.7587 $342.52 $3,000.03
1/11/2011 BUY CSCO 23.9826 $20.85 $500.04
1/11/2011 BUY XLF 30.6588 $16.31 $500.05
1/18/2011 BUY XLF 18.1065 $16.57 $300.02
1/18/2011 BUY VZ 8.587 $34.94 $300.03
1/18/2011 BUY AAPL 0.8944 $335.44 $300.02
1/18/2011 BUY CSCO 14.0954 $21.28 $299.95
1/25/2011 BUY VZ 8.3198 $35.94 $299.01
1/25/2011 BUY CSCO 13.9404 $21.45 $299.02
1/25/2011 BUY XLF 18.3283 $16.31 $298.93
1/25/2011 BUY AAPL 0.8858 $338.66 $299.99
2/1/2011 BUY AAPL 0.8705 $344.62 $299.99
2/1/2011 BUY VZ 8.3038 $36.13 $300.02
2/1/2011 BUY CSCO 14.046 $21.36 $300.02
2/1/2011 BUY XLF 18.0522 $16.62 $300.03
2/15/2011 BUY AAPL 0.8358 $358.92 $299.99
2/22/2011 BUY AAPL 0.8729 $343.69 $300.01
2/22/2011 BUY COMV 17.8891 $5.59 $100.00
3/1/2011 BUY CSCO 5.3482 $18.7 $100.01
3/1/2011 BUY OSTK 6.7114 $14.9 $100.00
3/1/2011 BUY XLF 11.9342 $16.76 $200.02
3/1/2011 BUY AAPL 1.4151 $353.33 $500.00
3/8/2011 BUY COMV 100 $5.69 $569.00
3/15/2011 BUY AND 54.2299 $13.83 $750.00
3/15/2011 BUY AMZN 6.0618 $164.97 $1,000.02
3/15/2011 BUY OSTK 34.2466 $14.6 $500.00
3/15/2011 BUY IHI 12.2011 $61.47 $750.00
3/22/2011 BUY IHI 1.5821 $63.21 $100.00
3/22/2011 BUY AND 6.9013 $14.49 $100.00
3/29/2011 BUY JNJ 5.0763 $59.1 $300.01
3/29/2011 BUY IHI 4.7081 $63.72 $300.00
3/29/2011 BUY COMV 106.8957 $4.67 $499.20
3/29/2011 BUY AND 34.225 $14.58 $499.00
4/5/2011 BUY JNJ 3.3424 $59.84 $200.01
4/5/2011 BUY IHI 3.0774 $64.99 $200.00
4/12/2011 BUY COMV 123.5147 $4.05 $500.23
4/12/2011 BUY VWO 10.2212 $48.92 $500.02
5/3/2011 BUY COMV 26.2467 $3.81 $100.00
5/17/2011 BUY IHI 2.9416 $67.99 $200.00
5/17/2011 BUY OSTK 14.5773 $13.72 $200.00
5/17/2011 BUY AMZN 3.0911 $194.11 $600.01
5/24/2011 BUY AMZN 1.281 $195.17 $250.01
5/24/2011 BUY OSTK 7.2516 $13.79 $100.00
5/24/2011 BUY AND 16.4799 $15.17 $250.00
5/24/2011 BUY COMV 26.8817 $3.72 $100.00
5/31/2011 BUY OSTK 6.9493 $14.39 $100.00
5/31/2011 BUY AND 16.0668 $15.56 $250.00
5/31/2011 BUY COMV 27.7778 $3.6 $100.00
5/31/2011 BUY AMZN 1.2732 $196.35 $249.99
8/9/2011 BUY COMV 90.2079 $2.22 $200.26
8/30/2011 BUY AAPL 0.2571 $388.89 $99.98
8/30/2011 BUY COMV 8.1967 $2.44 $20.00
9/13/2011 BUY COMV 45.8716 $2.18 $100.00
9/13/2011 BUY AAPL 0.7855 $381.94 $300.01
9/20/2011 BUY XLF 7.8692 $12.71 $100.02
10/4/2011 BUY COMV 32.0513 $1.56 $50.00
10/18/2011 BUY COMV 29.2398 $1.71 $50.00
10/18/2011 BUY AAPL 0.4768 $419.42 $199.98
10/18/2011 BUY XLF 20.1008 $12.44 $250.05
11/1/2011 SELL OSTK -69.7362 $7.98 -$556.49
11/1/2011 BUY XLF 3.8345 $13.04 $50.00
11/1/2011 BUY AAPL 0.1259 $397.21 $50.01
11/1/2011 BUY IHI 0.8651 $57.8 $50.00
11/8/2011 BUY SBUX 2.2921 $43.63 $100.00
11/8/2011 BUY MCD 1.5873 $94.5 $150.00
11/8/2011 BUY JNJ 3.1061 $64.39 $200.00
11/8/2011 BUY COMV 94.512 $1.59 $150.27
11/8/2011 BUY CVX 0.9323 $107.26 $100.00
11/11/2011 SELL COMV -1278.8363 $1.4 -$1,790.37
11/15/2011 BUY MCD 5.3191 $94 $500.00
11/15/2011 BUY IHI 12.0172 $58.25 $700.00
11/15/2011 BUY CVX 4.6936 $106.53 $500.01
11/15/2011 BUY SBUX 11.5027 $43.47 $500.02
11/22/2011 BUY VZ 15.2718 $35.95 $549.02
11/29/2011 BUY GE 5.2781 $14.97 $79.01
12/20/2011 BUY MCD 2.5376 $98.52 $250.00
12/20/2011 BUY JNJ 3.8881 $64.3 $250.00
12/20/2011 BUY AAPL 3.8201 $392.66 $1,500.00
12/27/2011 BUY WFM 3.6525 $68.45 $250.01
12/27/2011 BUY MCD 2.4819 $100.73 $250.00
12/27/2011 BUY GE 27.5957 $18.12 $500.03
12/27/2011 BUY AAPL 2.4613 $406.28 $999.98
1/3/2012 BUY XLF 14.9158 $13.41 $200.02
1/3/2012 BUY GE 21.6685 $18.46 $400.00
1/3/2012 BUY HAO 20.3149 $19.69 $400.00
1/10/2012 BUY VWO 7.5228 $39.88 $300.01
1/10/2012 BUY HAO 20.2327 $19.77 $400.00
1/10/2012 BUY AND 23.2019 $12.93 $300.00
1/20/2012 SELL PBD -32.849 $9.01 -$295.97
1/20/2012 SELL ENOC -19.1743 $9.32 -$178.70
1/24/2012 BUY HAO 23.5073 $21.27 $500.00
1/24/2012 BUY CSCO 40.5143 $19.75 $800.16
1/24/2012 BUY CBOU 36.9004 $16.26 $600.00
1/25/2012 SELL GLD -5.8054 $161.07 -$935.08
1/25/2012 BUY AAPL 2 $449.72 $899.44
1/27/2012 SELL CVX -5.6696 $104.43 -$592.08
1/31/2012 BUY HAO 14.3747 $20.87 $300.00
1/31/2012 BUY CBOU 17.7305 $16.92 $300.00
2/7/2012 BUY F 23.1839 $12.94 $300.00
2/7/2012 BUY HAO 8.9646 $22.31 $200.00
2/7/2012 BUY CBOU 28.3815 $17.62 $500.08
2/14/2012 BUY CBOU 28.3126 $17.66 $500.00
2/14/2012 BUY HAO 11.0619 $22.6 $250.00
2/14/2012 BUY AAPL 0.9933 $503.36 $499.99
2/15/2012 SELL XLF -333.2679 $14.6 -$4,865.71
2/15/2012 SELL KOL -2.9796 $35.44 -$105.60
2/15/2012 SELL EPI -51.2841 $21.04 -$1,079.02
2/16/2012 BUY AAPL 3 $491.31 $1,473.93
2/16/2012 BUY AAPL 4 $491.31 $1,965.24
2/21/2012 BUY CBOU 56.4972 $17.7 $1,000.00
2/21/2012 BUY AAPL 0.9773 $511.6 $499.99
2/21/2012 BUY INTC 36.6219 $27.31 $1,000.14
2/24/2012 BUY BV 8 $16.74 $133.92
2/28/2012 BUY F 24.4956 $12.25 $300.07
2/28/2012 BUY CBOU 17.8465 $16.81 $300.00
2/28/2012 BUY BV 11 $16.39 $180.29
2/28/2012 BUY INTC 7.354 $27.2 $200.03
3/1/2012 SELL F -47.6795 $12.45 -$593.61
3/1/2012 SELL EWZ -3.5739 $69.59 -$248.71
3/1/2012 SELL CSCO -143.6651 $19.91 -$2,860.37
3/6/2012 BUY INTC 37.9996 $26.32 $1,000.15
3/6/2012 BUY HAO 44.5633 $22.44 $1,000.00
3/6/2012 BUY AAPL 3.0447 $525.51 $1,600.02
3/27/2012 BUY INTC 8.8791 $28.16 $250.04
3/27/2012 BUY CBOU 16.6232 $18.05 $300.05
4/3/2012 BUY INTC 17.689 $28.27 $500.07
4/3/2012 BUY CBOU 31.8382 $18.22 $580.09
4/23/2012 BUY AAPL 1 $570.8 $570.80
4/26/2012 BUY SPLK 13 $34.72 $451.36
5/8/2012 BUY INTC 18.4392 $27.12 $500.07
5/8/2012 BUY AAPL 2.668 $562.22 $1,500.00
5/21/2012 SELL CBOU -134 $10.14 -$1,358.76
5/22/2012 BUY KO 6.7233 $74.37 $500.01
5/22/2012 BUY VZ 12.0487 $41.5 $500.02
5/22/2012 BUY AAPL 0.8672 $567.36 $492.01
5/31/2012 SELL AND -153.5133 $13.49 -$2,070.89
6/4/2012 SELL SPLK -13 $27.8 -$361.40
6/5/2012 BUY AAPL 1.1521 $564.17 $649.98
6/5/2012 BUY INTC 23.8132 $25.2 $600.09
6/5/2012 BUY JNJ 9.6512 $62.17 $600.02
6/5/2012 BUY MCD 6.9456 $86.39 $600.03
6/19/2012 BUY JNJ 3.7398 $66.85 $250.01
6/19/2012 BUY MSFT 16.1363 $30.99 $500.06
6/19/2012 BUY INTC 9.079 $27.54 $250.04
8/20/2012 SELL BV -19 $14.14 -$268.66
10/23/2012 BUY JNJ 7.0545 $70.88 $500.02
10/23/2012 BUY AAPL 2.3947 $626.38 $1,499.99
10/23/2012 BUY KO 13.6099 $36.74 $500.03
10/23/2012 BUY F 49.8644 $10.03 $500.14
11/6/2012 BUY KO 13.5045 $37.02 $499.94
11/6/2012 BUY F 43.8982 $11.39 $500.00
11/6/2012 BUY AAPL 0.8543 $585.29 $500.01
11/6/2012 BUY JNJ 7.0238 $71.19 $500.02
12/11/2012 BUY JNJ 8.0424 $71.5 $575.03
12/11/2012 BUY F 49.9783 $11.51 $575.25
2/11/2013 SELL INTC -164.0793 $21 -$3,445.67
2/11/2013 SELL MSFT -16.3785 $27.62 -$452.37
2/12/2013 BUY HYG 5.3625 $93.24 $500.00
2/19/2013 BUY HYG 5.3476 $93.5 $500.00
4/9/2013 BUY HYG 5.3009 $94.32 $499.98
4/16/2013 BUY HYG 5.2955 $94.42 $500.00
4/23/2013 BUY HYG 5.2665 $94.94 $500.00
6/4/2013 BUY F 21.2966 $15.92 $339.04
6/5/2013 SELL HYG -26.8168 $92.19 -$2,472.24
6/5/2013 SELL AAPL -10 $445.65 -$4,456.50
7/2/2013 SELL AAPL -43 $410 -$17,630.00
7/9/2013 BUY F 35.3773 $16.85 $596.11
7/9/2013 BUY WFM 10.9913 $54.22 $595.95
7/16/2013 BUY F 35.7838 $16.66 $596.16
7/16/2013 BUY WFM 10.5819 $56.32 $595.97
7/23/2013 BUY CARZ 13.3982 $37.02 $496.00
7/23/2013 BUY VOO 6.402 $77.48 $496.03
7/23/2013 BUY F 29.3752 $16.89 $496.15
7/30/2013 BUY F 28.896 $17.17 $496.14
7/30/2013 BUY CARZ 13.4454 $36.89 $496.00
7/30/2013 BUY VOO 6.4153 $77.32 $496.03
8/6/2013 BUY VOO 6.3887 $77.64 $496.02
8/6/2013 BUY F 29.0262 $17.09 $496.06
8/6/2013 BUY CARZ 13.188 $37.61 $496.00
8/13/2013 BUY CARZ 13.1705 $37.66 $496.00
8/13/2013 BUY SBUX 6.8693 $72.21 $496.03
8/13/2013 BUY VOO 6.4178 $77.29 $496.03
11/12/2013 BUY GOOG 0.4905 $1011.24 $496.01
11/12/2013 BUY VOO 3.0584 $162.18 $496.01
12/17/2013 BUY HAO 9.0189 $26.5 $239.00